CATASETUM

kat-ah-SEE-tum

From the Greek kata (down) and Latin seta ( bristle)

This unusual group of orchids offers fascinating, waxy flowers that often have the peculiar habit of discharging their pollen masses (pollinia) onto pollinators. Almost always deciduous, the pseudobulbous plants have strict growing and resting periods. Most flower before entering a dormant period when they drop their leaves.

 

The following is from Internet Orchid Species Photo Encyclopedia

There are 70 species spread from Mexico to Argentina and the West Indies of this deciduous fleshy pseudobulb with eight to twelve leaves. The inflorescence starts at the base of the pseudobulbs and may be erect or pendulous with male or female flowers . The male flowers are characterized with the ability to eject their pollina up to eight feet from the plant.  The female flower can be seen with the male pollina in it's stigmatic cavity [see#1 in photo]. The male flower in the upper right of the picture shows that it has ejected it's pollina [see#2 in photo], first in that it is missing it's pollinarium and second by the limp colorless look of the flower in general as compared to the flower below [see #3 in photo]

The next photo shows a dried female flower [See #2 in photo] 1 day after a successful encounter with a male pollina, next to a non impregnated flower [see#3 in photo]. Note the swollen ovary [#1 in the photo] which is actually the stem of the flower. Here is where the seed will develop and in 3-4 months the seed will be mature and the capsule will dry and break open spilling the seed to the wind.

SOURCE: Internet Orchid Species Photo Encyclopedia

Children categories

CULTURE

Learn more about the growing and appreciating of the Catesetum from various sources.

View items...

SPECIES

Species, by definition, are produced in nature.  Orchid species are a bit more difficult to tend to as they are accustomed to specific conditions and much less forgiving than hybrids.

View items...

HYBRIDS

The vast majority of plants for sale are hybrids that some breeder dreamed up and made a reality. The resulting progeny from the union of two different species (known as a primary hybrid), or of a species and a hybrid, or of two hybrids (known as a complex hybrid). Typically easier to tend to as growing conditions along with the appearance of the flower are considered in the hybrid process.

View items...
Thursday, 03 December 2015 22:28

Additional Information

Written by
Rate this item
(0 votes)

A collection of Catasetum related links to items of interest found on the Internet, that do not fit in any of the three main catagories.

Thursday, 03 December 2015 16:37

Catasetum (From Wikipedia)

Written by
Rate this item
(0 votes)

Catasetum, abbreviated as Ctsm in horticultural trade, is a genus of showy epiphytic Orchids, family (Orchidaceae), subfamily Epidendroideae, tribe Cymbidieae, subtribe Catasetinae, with 166 species, many of which are highly prized in horticulture.

Species of the genus Catasetum occur from Mexico to Argentina, including much of Central America, the West Indies, and South America. The largest number of species is in Brazil.

Saturday, 12 September 2015 23:58

Catasetum fimbriatum Featured

Written by
Rate this item
(0 votes)

Catasetum fimbriatum 

LIGHT
Information goes here
WATER
Information goes here
HUMIDITY
Information goes here
TEMPERATURE
Information goes here
BLOOM SEASON
Information goes here

 

 

 

 

IMPRESSION

 

 

Last modified on Friday, 04 December 2015 00:14
Thursday, 03 December 2015 20:45

Catasetum Plant Culture

Written by
Rate this item
(0 votes)

The cultural information below is a generalization and will apply in most situations; however each grower and growing environment is different. I encourage you to make adjustments based on your experience and growing conditions.

Catasetinae have a distinctive growth and rest period (dormancy). For best plant growth it is important to understand and respect these growth phases. When the plants are in active growth maintain constant root zone moisture and fertilize regularly. This is essential to optimizing the development of new growth. When the plants are dormant little or no water is needed as the pseudobulbs store enough moisture and nutrients to survive the dormancy.

Catasetinae plant culture is not difficult. All it takes is an understanding of the seasonal growth patterns. The plants vegetative state signals to the grower their changing needs. Interpret the signals and make the appropriate cultural adjustments. Here is what to look for:

Thursday, 03 December 2015 18:41

Culture of Catasetinae (Catasetum)

Written by
Rate this item
(0 votes)

The Sub-tribe Catasetinae includes the Genera Catasetum, Clowesia, Cycnoches, Dressleria, and Mormodes. Culture of Dressleria even though once included in the genus Catasetum is different. Do not try to grow Dressleria species using these suggestions.

The plants of Tribe Catasetinae are widespread in lowland tropical areas of South and Central America up to elevations of about 1200-1500 meters. Most of the discussion which follows pertains particularly to Catasetum a genus with 80-120 species. The plants can generally be found growing on trees, tree stumps, or old fence posts. The plants are weedy and tend to be fairly abundant once you find the first plant or plants.

Thursday, 03 December 2015 15:54

General Culture Sheet (AOS)

Written by
Rate this item
(0 votes)
Thursday, 03 December 2015 19:21

Stephen's Catasetinae Culture (Catasetum)

Written by
Rate this item
(0 votes)

Catasetum, Clowesia, Cycnoches, and Mormodes are the primary genera that compose the catasetinae.  They can be grown easily without the necessity of a greenhouse. They can grow in just about every kind of medium that you can imagine.  Here's how Stephen grows his catasetums.

DISCLAIMER

All information presented here is for educational and informational purposes only under the guidelines of "Fair Use" policies defined by US Copyright law(s).  Some images and select text are protected by respective copyright holders. Material presented here is done so as educational, and "as is".  The Napa Valley Orchid Society, it's executive Board, General members and the web site maintainer cannot be held liable for any damages incurred.

When necessary, images and texts will be fully credited to the original.

Information here may be used by other orchid societies as long as they credit the original creator and at least mention the Napa Valley Orchid Website as a courtesy.

TOP