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Catasetum saccatum

 

Common Name The Sack-Shaped Catasetum

Flower Size 4" [9 to 10 cm]

 

Found as a large sized, variable, caespitose, hot to cool growing epiphyte in Guyana, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Brazil in tropical montane forests on many different types of trees at altitudes of 200 to 1700 meters, with fusiform, elongate pseudobulbs with 4 to 7 elliptic-lanceolate, petiolate, acute leaves that blooms from the early winter through spring on an erect or pendant, 8" to 16" [25 to 68 cm] long, loose to many [3 to 21] flowered, bracteate, racemose inflorescence carrying fragrant flowers arising on a nearly mature pseudobulb

Like most Catasetum, needs a definite rest period after the blooming season when it will drop its leaves. The flowers are different in that they can eject their pollina up to 8 ft from the plant. This species enjoys nearly full sunlight, warmth, plenty of water and fertilizer and only needs a rest if it has become obviously dormant.

See also Catasetum incurvum which is often cited as a synonym of C saccatum but has sufficient differences to be kept a species in it's own right. Tthey differ in the size of the flowers, the lip and the densly flowered inflorescence.

 

Source: http://www.orchidspecies.com/catasetumsacatum.htm

 

Items of Interest:

 

(Catasetum saccatum 'Dark Warrior'  x  Catasetum saccatum 'Brooklyn Botanic Garden' FCC/AOS)

 

(Catasetum saccatum 'Brooklyn Botanic Garden' FCC/AOS x 'Dark Warrior')  (inverse of the above)

 

Catasetum saccatum 'Brooklyn Botanic Garden' FCC/AOS

 

Catasetum saccatum 'Dark Warrior'

 

 

 

Variants:

Catasetum saccatum var chlorops Rchb.f 1882 - See Catasetum saccatum Lindley 1840

Catasetum saccatum var christyanum [Rchb.f] Mansfield 1942- See Catasetum saccatum Lindley 1840

Catasetum saccatum var. eusaccatum Mansf. 1932 - See Catasetum saccatum Lindley 1840

Catasetum saccatum var. incurvum (Lindl.) Mansf. 1932 - See Catasetum incurvum Klotzsch 1854

Catasetum saccatum var. pliciferum Rchb.f 1869 - See Catasetum saccatum Lindley 1840

Catasetum saccatum var. typum Hoehne 1942 - See Catasetum saccatum Lindley 1840

http://www.orchidspecies.com/indexc.htm

 

 

Distribution:

Native to:   Bolivia, Brazil North, Brazil West-Central, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru, Venezuela

http://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:621924-1

 

 

 

https://www.gbif.org/species/2803722

 

This map above pinpoints exact locations based on GPS where Catasetum saccatum have been spotted by botonists and other "orchid hunters".

Gallery:

You can learn a lot about an orchid from looking, and admiring, various images of that orchid.  I try to find images that give me an idea how big the actual orchid can get so I can plan ahead and make room for it as it grows.  I also like a few images of the orchid  in natural settings.  When ever possible, I try and include oddities and examples as well.

 

the dorsal petals sometimes can be fused with the dorsal sepal as in the above pic or sometimes they will 'open' up

 

Catasetum saccatum, male flower, 4 cm across

 

 

Catasetum saccatum, Cusco Peru / male and female flowers, Guido Deburghgraeve

 

Growth and Culture:

 

Introduction:

 

Catasetum saccatum is found in Brazil, Amazon region, at altitudes below 200 meters and exposed to much sunlight, from the states of Pará, Amazonas, Minas Gerais, and Acre to Colombia, eastern Peru and Ecuador, and northeastern Bolivia. It grows in hot, moist lowland areas with only a brief dry season, often found on dead trees in full sunlight.

 

Catasetum saccatum also called as The Sack-Shaped Catasetum, Catasetum baraquinianum, Catasetum christyanum, Catasetum christyanum var. chlorops, Catasetum christyanum var. obscurum, Catasetum colossus, Catasetum cruciatum, Catasetum histrio, Catasetum japurense, Catasetum saccatum var chlorops, Catasetum saccatum var. christyanum, Catasetum saccatum var. eusaccatum, Catasetum saccatum var. pliciferum, Catasetum saccatum var. typum, Catasetum secundum, Catasetum stupendum, is a species of the genus Catasetum. This species was described by John Lindley in 1840.

 
 
Description:
 

Catasetum saccatum is found in Brazil, Amazon region, at altitudes below 200 meters and exposed to much sunlight, from the states of Pará, Amazonas, Minas Gerais, and Acre to Colombia, eastern Peru and Ecuador, and northeastern Bolivia. It grows in hot, moist lowland areas with only a brief dry season, often found on dead trees in full sunlight.

It is a large sized, variable, caespitose, hot to cool growing epiphyte with fusiform, elongate, to 26 cm long and 3.5 cm wide pseudobulbs with 4 to 7 elliptic-lanceolate, petiolate, acute, to 42 cm long and 8 cm wide leaves.
 
The Sack-Shaped Catasetum blooms from the early winter through spring on an erect or pendant, 25 to 68 cm long, 3 to 21 flowered, bracteate, racemose inflorescence carrying fragrant flowers arising on a nearly mature pseudobulb. The male flowers are 82 x 98 mm with coloration of sepals dark brown without appreciable spotting; petals green with profuse dark brown spots; lip light brown, but white around the rim of the cavity opening; column and antennae yellow-green. The female flowers has sepals and petals smaller, reflexed; lip huge, pouch-shaped, held uppermost; margins rolled-back and slightly toothed; column short and stout with coloration of sepals and petals yellow-green.
 
This species is often confused with Catasetum osculatum. Inflorescences pendent, pedicels long, flowers large and dark brown or red-brown, always with conspicuous spots; lip trilobed, with all margins turned down and fringed, always longer than wide, with a kidney-shaped orifice and 3 keels, rim of orifice always light-colored, column and pollinarium long.
 
 
 

Care and Culture

 
Cultural information should only be used as a guide, and should be to be adapted to suit you. Your physical location; where you grow your plants, how much time you have to devote to their care, and many other factors, will need to be taken into account. Only then can you decide on the cultural methods that best suit you and your plants.
 
 
Light:
 

Catasetum saccatum are sun-loving plant and needs a light level of 30000-60000 lux, nearly full sunlight. This species can be grown under lights if sufficient light intensity can be provided, and the plant certainly can be summered outdoors if their moisture requirements can be met.

 

Temperature:

In their natural habitat, the climate is evenly hot, moist, and tropical. This climate is almost the same year-round, with high humidity at night, even in the dry season, which is relatively short. The nighttime temperatures rarely fall below 18°C, with daytime highs generally from 29 to 35°C. The important thing is to maintain evenly warm conditions, and for this orchid the closer the night minimum is to 21°C, the better the plants will respond.

 

Humidity:

The Sack-Shaped Catasetum tolerate an environment with 40 - 60 % relative humidity during their growing season, but for optimal development of new growth and flowering, 70 % is recommended.

 

Substrate, growing media and repotting:

Catasetum saccatum is best to grown suspended in a wooden basket with fir bark, osmunda, tree fern fiber, charcoal, and sphagnum, in various proportions or combined with still other ingredients such as sponge rock, perlite, leaf mold, peat, and bark screenings as substrate.

 
It is recommended to repot every year and never wait more than two years. The optimal time for potting or repotting is when new growth on a plant emerging from dormancy is about 5 cm tall and the nubs have developed into new roots that are reaching for support.
 
 
Watering:
 

In its natural habitat it receives rainfall frequently even while dormant. The plant may be watered every sunny day during the growing season, provided conditions are such that they dry off relatively quickly. This species like to dry out at least slightly between waterings.

 
 
Fertilizer:
 

Fertilize with an appropriate formulation at least every week during the growing season, or fertilize with a weak formula every time the plants are watered. It is important to begin regular applications of high-nitrogen fertilizer (such as 10-5-5) with a full range of trace elements. As the leaves begin to unfurl, and well before flowering, add a high-phosphorus formula to develop big, strong pseudobulbs capable of producing robust inflorescences. Any of the soluble products with a large second-digit number (for example, 3-12-6) constitute a good source of phosphorus.

 
 
Rest period:
 

Catasetum saccatum have a relatively short dormant period between leaf fall and new growth. When the plants are leafless and no new growths are visible, the grower must respect their state of dormancy. Watering frequency should be reduced during dormancy. Fertilization should stop completely during this period. In the springtime, at the beginning of the growth cycle, water should not be made regularly available for the newly developing roots until the new growth is at least 5 cm tall.

https://travaldo.blogspot.com/2019/01/catasetum-saccatum-care-and-culture.html

 

Read More:

http://www.indefenseofplants.com/blog/2017/12/27/the-extraordinary-catasetum-orchids

http://www.orchidflowerhq.com/Catasetumcare.php

http://www.rv-orchidworks.com/orchidtalk/orchids-other-genera-bloom/37260-catasetum-saccatum.html

https://www.orchidboard.com/community/catasetum-and-stanhopea-alliance/1366-catasetum-saccatum.html

http://catasetum-ian.blogspot.com/2013/08/catasetum-saccatum-second-plant.html

 

Last modified on Wednesday, 29 January 2020 13:16
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