Saturday, 09 February 2019 00:09
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Fredclarkeara Beverly Danielson

 

SVO 6487
(Fredclarkeara After Midnight 'SVO Dark Beauty' FCC/AOS' x Catasetum Orchidglade 'Davies Ranches' AM/AOS)

With this cross we are taking the nearly perfect darkest burgundy flowers of Fredclarkeara After Midnight 'SVO Dark Beauty' and pairing them with the huge lip and colorful spotted flower of Catasetum Orchidglade. Our experience has taught us that this type of hybrid makes for improved flower form. The flower color of the progeny will range from solid deep burgundy to densely spotted burgundy, and a few might even be light yellow with bold red spots. These will be unique and beautiful flowers. Photo to the right is the flower the cross was named after.  (SVO 6487)

 

SVO 6480      
(Fredclarkeara After Midnight 'SVO' AM/AOS x Catasetum Orchidglade 'Davie Ranches' AM/AOS)

At SVO we are all about developing flowers with new looks and colors.  With this cross, the dark red flowers with very dark burgundy spots of Fredclarkeara After Midnight'SVO' are paired with the huge lip and colorful spotted flower of Catasetum Orchidglade.  Past experience has taught us this type of hybrid makes for improved flower form while allowing for new color combinations.  The flower color of the progeny will range from red and densely spotted to light yellow with bold red spots, and a few will be the darkest burgundy.  There is lots of potential to get unique flowers from this cross.  (SVO 6480)

 

bloom

Photo Credit:  Fred Clarke, Sunset Valley Orchids

(Descriptions courtesy of Fred Clarke, Sunset Valley Orchids)

 

Parentage:

 

(Fredclarkeara After Midnight 'SVO Dark Beauty' FCC/AOS'Catasetum Orchidglade 'Davies Ranches' AM/AOS)

 

 Male (Pollen Provider)

Bloom of Female Parent

 

Top Photo:  Fredclarkeara After Midnight 'SVO Dark Beauty' FCC/AOS'

 

Photo Right:  Catasetum Orchidglade 'Davies Ranches' AM/AOS

 

Photo Credit:  Fred Clarke, Sunset Valley Orchids

 

Female (Seed Pod)

Bloom of Male Parent

 


(Fredclarkeara After Midnight 'SVO' AM/AOS x Catasetum Orchidglade 'Davie Ranches' AM/AOS)

 

 Male (Pollen Provider)

 

Top Photo:  Fredclarkeara After Midnight 'SVO' AM/AOS'

 

Photo Right:  Catasetum Orchidglade 'Davies Ranches' AM/AOS

 

Photo Credit:  Fred Clarke, Sunset Valley Orchids

 

Female (Seed Pod)

Bloom of Male Parent

 

I know it might seem confusing as to why there are two separate listings for  Fredclarkeara Beverly Danielson and for a time I was confused as well.  Above we have two parings but a closer examination would reveal that both pollen parents are the same, but a different cultivar name (Fredclarkeara After Midnight 'SVO Dark Beauty' FCC/AOS') and (Fredclarkeara After Midnight 'SVO' AM/AOS).  To the cassual grower, this does not mean anything.  'SVO Black Beauty' received a high score than the 'SVO' and the former's flowers might be a little better as far as quality is concerned.  What may be confusing is that on the web site, they are identified as Fredclarkeara, but the tag identifies them as being Catasetum.  Again to the casual grower, this perhaps means little unless exhibiting the orchid for AOS judging.  As far as a show is concerned both  the Catasetum and Fredclarkeara are contained in the Catasetinae sub-division of the Cymbidium Alliance.  In the end, if you hybridize with better quality parents, the offsprinbg result should be of better quality.  Therefore, SVO item 6487 could potentially be better than SVO item 6480.   I am also concluding that SVO Item 6480 was the first attempt, and at a later time Sunset Valley Orchids repeated the process with a better quality pollen provider.

Both of these items have been removed from the current "available" page on Sunset Valley Orchid's web site and can be found in the archive here:  http://sunsetvalleyorchids.com/htm/archive_catasetinae1_master2017.html meaning the next time they be available is through limited divisions, so keep an eye on SVO for his divisions.

 .

 

 

 

Ancestry

 

 

Clowesia warczewitzii

Clowesia Grace Dunn 1959

Clowesia rosea

 Clowesia Rebecca Northen 1971

Clowesia rosea

 Mormodia Painted Desert 1996

Mormodes sinuata

 Fredclarkeara After Dark 2002

Catasetum tenebrosum

Catasetum Donna Wise 1995

Catasetum pileatum

Catasetum Orchidglade 1974

Catasetum expansum

Fredclarkeara After Midnight 2009

Catasetum tenebrosum

Catasetum Donna Wise 1995

Catasetum pileatum

Catasetum Orchidglade 1974

Catasetum expansum

Catasetum Mark Dimmitt 2005 

Catasetum pileatum

Catasetum Orchidglade 1974

Catasetum expansum

Fredclarkeara Beverly Danielson  2017

Catasetum pileatum 

Catasetum Orchidglade 1974 

Catasetum expansum 

 

 

 

 

Species Ancestry  
   
Catasetum expansum  37.5%
Catasetum pileatum  37.5%
Catasetum tenebrosum  12.5%
Clowesia rosea  4.69%
Clowesia warczewitzii  1.56%
Mormodes sinuata  6.25%
   
Hybrid Ancestry  
   
Clowesia Grace Dunn  3.13%
Clowesia Rebecca Northen  6.25%
Catasetum Orchidglade  75%
Catasetum Donna Wise  25%
Mormodia Painted Desert  12.5%
Fredclarkeara After Dark  25%
Catasetum Mark Dimmitt  25%
Fredclarkeara After Midnight  50%

 

Clicking on the images below will reveal these species individual information

37.5% 37.5%  
12.5%
6.25% 4.69% 1.56%
Catasetum expansum Catasetum. pileatum Catasetum. tenebrosum Mormodes sinuata Clowesia rosea Clowesia warczewitzii

 

 

Growth Habits

Understanding how an orchid grows is as important as understanding where it grows naturally.  This can help in the deciding of keeping it in a standard pot where the blooms are supported on strong spikes that naturally point upward, or pendulous spikes that prefer to drape down the side of the pot.  Below is a collection of images of the entire orchid, or at least images that show how the  prefers to grow naturally. 

 

 

Not exactly sure what is being displayed here.  I tracked the image down on facebook to the actual post but there was no description / explanation provided.

 

Click the image to reveal the original in full-size.

 

There is a spike on the right and left with tiny buds starting to form.  it is possible that as the buds mature, the spikes become pendulous drooping down along the sides of the pot due to the wieght of the blooms.  I have no explanation why the foliage is missing. This particular orchid is about3 years old judging by the number and size of the bulbs.  The newest bulb is supporting the spikes and buds.

   

Two pendulous spikes with numerous mature blooms.

 

Click the image to reveal the original in full-size.

 

I tried searching why some orchids have pendulous spikes and had no luck finding any explanation.  My best guess for pendulous spikes is to gain maximum exposure to the preferred pollinator.  This does not mean that one has to allow the spikes to droop.  If you have room to hang this type of orchid, pendulous spikes be no problem.  If you are unable to hang the orchid, with proper training and support the spikes can be maintained in an upright position.

 

 

 Fdk. After Midnight x Ctsm. Orchidglade
Fdk. After Midnight x Ctsm. Orchidglade
Fdk. After Midnight x Ctsm. Orchidglade
Fdk. After Midnight x Ctsm. Orchidglade

 

Fredclarkeara Beverly Danielson 'Corn!' AM/AOS (82 points) at the Pacific South Monthly Judging on 10/2/18.

Exhibitor Dan Forbes, photographed by Arnold Gum

 

Awarded Exhibits:

 

 

Fredclarkeara Beverly Danielson ‘Corn!’ AM/AOS 82 pts.
© Arnold Gum 2018

Plant Name: Fredclarkeara Beverly Danielson ‘Corn!’ AM/AOS 82 pts.


Parentage: (Fdk. After Midnight x Ctsm. Orchidglade)

Natural Spread Horizontal: 6.4 cm Vertical: 4.5 cm
Dorsal Sepal
Width: 1.6 cm Length: 3.2 cm
Petal Width: 2.2 cm Length: 3.2 cm
Lateral Sepal (Synsepal): Width: 2.0 cm Length: 3.6 cm
Lip (Pouch): Width: 3.0 cm Length: 2.8 cm

Description: Twenty-three flowers on two arching pendulous, 22.0-cm inflorescences; sepals and petals green-cream, sepals densely spotted very dark maroon along veins, coalescing proximally; petals finely spotted very dark maroon coalescing medially, overlaid with large very dark maroon spots; lip saccate , green-cream, lightly spotted maroon on side lobes, midlobe heavily overlaid very dark maroon, crest semi-circular, toothed, margins erose; column green-cream, lightly spotted dark maroon, anther cap green; texture firm; substance waxy.
Exhibitor: Dan Forbes

 

I only include the following for the purpose of possibly determining a "peak bloom season".

 

 
82 points
 
Fredclarkeara Beverly Danielson 'Corn!' AM/AOS at the Pacific South Monthly Judging on 2 October 2018 to exhibitor Dan Forbes, photographed by Arnold Gum
 
   
 

84 points

Fredclarkeara Beverly Danielson 'Tyrone' AM/AOS exhibited by Charlie Fouquette in November 2018.

   
   
   
 
 
 
 
 
 

Brief Grow Blog and Pictures

 
 
 
 

February 2019

Acquired from Sunset Valley Orchids.  This four-year-old seedling has 3 bulbs and upon removing from the box I was happy to discover it had already started developing a new growth for the 2019 growing season. It is currently situated in a 3-inch pot in moss with styrofoam peanuts filling the bottom 1/3 of the pot surrounded by abundant roots.  Old roots do not contribute to the new growth.

 

As the orchid is still considered dormant and the last bulb is supplying nutrients and water for the new growth, nothing is required  except allowing to be exposed in indirect sunlight in a relatively humid environment.  On occasion, to prevent the last year's bulb from shriveling, I will mist the orchid and that water will run down and add moisture to the area immediately surrounding the base of the bulb.  Keeping the entire orchid in a high humidity environment should also preventi last year's bulb from shriveling.

 

I will be watching for the new growth to extend to about an inch in length and new roots from its base.  Once the roots are about 2 inches in length and the new growth has developed and spreading of tiny leaves, I will consider the next step of potting up in fresh slightly damp moss removing the old styrofoam.The moss will be kept barely damp with a small amount of water as needed.  The terrarium and its high humidity is no longer required as the new roots have started taking in water.  It will be positioned in the mini-greenhouse with bright light and high humidity along with warm temperatures during th day and cooling off at night. As the new growth increases in size, watering will also be increased along with the adding of fertilizer.

 

10 February

Based on advice from this article, I fought off the hesitation to do this, but Fred Clarke said it is fine in a dry climate to water dormant bulbs.  SO I did, and lucky to pick a partly coudy day where they were drenched and set in the mini-greenhouse to dry in the sun on the same day before sunset.  ( http://herebutnot.com/care-growing-catasetinae-dry-climates/ )

 
 
 
 
 
 

1 March 2019

Even with my bad photography skills it should be no problem seeing the new growth on this orchid (near the center, bottom).  Of interest, thie first bulb is sandwhiched between recent growthys. (right and left).  New growth is from the right, making me wonder if the left bulb will also support a new growth. 

 

 

1 April 2019  (date of photo is 20190401)

 

Notice the amount of growth in just one month's time.

 

Re-potted into it's grow season pot.  Removed the styrofoam peanuts from the old root-ball but this year I left a majority of the previous roots undisturbed.  Arranged the old root mass to be nested in fresh damp moss using the old surface of moss as a guide to determine the position so that this year's new growth is centered as much as possible and level if not just above the level of new moss - some sinking / settling might occur and to prevent this the moss below the old root-mass is compressed.  One thing I wanted to avoid is sinking the bulb too low in the moss.

 

One might be tempted to start watering as the new growth is showing it's leaves, roots are working their way into the medium - but no.  Fred Clarke suggests perhaps waiting a month before full watering with diluted fertilizer.

 

I carefully add a few drops of water from a turkey baster on the outer edge of the pot to keep the moss damp.  By the end of April I suspect the spikes be more obvious and the new growth be ready for watering with a diluted fertilizer.  Currently, this orchid is in the second row from the front getting ambient light until the afternoon, bright light in the afternoon with some more direct but diffused light mid-afternoon to sunset.

 

(Mental note:  remaining pictures for this grow blog will be situated with the growth in the same position so as to avoid confusion and attempt to be consistent.)

 

 

1 May 2019

 

 

 

 

1 June 2019

 

If this was growing vertical it be a foot tall with a leaf spread of a foot (length  of tip to tip) as well

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 2019

Care:  Moss in a semi-hydroponic, almost clear plastic food container.  Exposed to bright light, but not direct "cattleya" light.  All greenhouse items are placed in a water tray for extra humidity due to evaporation.  Exposure (time of) direct light is on the increase as the solstice has passed and the sun slowly gets lower in the horizon.  This also means heat is on the increase in the mini-greenhouse as well.

 

Fredclarkeras are water hogs, so drowning from over-watering is difficult at best.  Starting back in late April, when the new growth was about 2 inches tall, I started watering to moisten the moss with a few squirts from a turkey baster near but not immediately surrounding the new growth.  Once the new growth reached 4 inches, I could only guess the roots were established (2-3 inches in length) and started absorbing water, so I would increase watering with a balanced but very diluted fertilizer.  In may, I slightly increased the fertilizer and watering as needed.  Because their is a reservoir of water at the bottom of the pot, I did not fertilize except for once a week, the rest of the waterings during that week would dilute the reservoir.

 

I doubt it matters much but on the left-hand side, one of the leaves is twisted enough so that the underside is facing up.  I am sure in nature this happens frequently and is not expected to be a issue. 

 

With the advent of July, watering with very diluted fertilizer is just about every oher day and during any heatwave more as needed.

 

 

 

August 2019

Spike Watch!  Looking gently, with my fingers, I felt a "growth" sticking out and up the base of the new growth and did my best to try and take some pictures of what could be the first spike developing, or at worst, an eye for next year's growth.  I am hoping for the former.  By mid-August, I should know for sure.  It is difficult at best to spot in the image, left,  but it's there.

 

An advantage of the moss compressing and sink into down in the pot, the bulbs are not necessarily sinking so the base of the new growth is kind of hovering just above the medium.  Not exactly sure how I feel about this as I mentioned in the general observations that I am concerned a bit about this compressing moss restricting air-flow around the roots.  Dormancy inspection will answer all kinds of questions.

 

 

 

 

 

Fredclarkeara Beverly Danielson

  Flowering by Week 1 to 52
AVE. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52
 
2019 1 2 3 4 5 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52
2020 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52

 

 

 
I possess this orchid new growth spotted leaflets and roots growth stage  spike  bloom  dormancy

 

 

Read 603 times Last modified on Sunday, 04 August 2019 01:51
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