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(Mormodia Painted Desert 'SVO' HCC/AOS x Catasetum callosum 'Black Lip' AM/AOS)

This is a truly novel Fredclarkeara hybrid. I have been waiting several years to have this available - the potential is tantalizing! Painted Desert has a well-documented and long history of breeding excellent offspring, adding color, shape and flower longevity. This the first cross with the 'Black Lip' cultivar of callosum. Its color is exceptional, and inflorescences have high flower count and beautiful arrangement. This pairing has tremendous potential! Will the flowers be like black stars? 

 

Left Photo: Mormodes Painted Desert 'SVO' HCC/AOS 

Right Photo:  Catasetum callosum 'Black Lip' AM/AOS 

(Above description and photo credit:  Fred Clarke, Sunset Valley Orchids)

   

 

 

This is an unregistered (unnamed) hybrid, so as of yet there are no pictures of the actual orchid.  For now we have to rely on the parents of this hybrid for a possible idea of what this orchid will look like once brought to bloom

 

(Mormodia Painted Desert 'SVO' HCC/AOS  x  Catasetum callosum 'Black Lip' AM/AOS)

 

 

Below you will find information on:

 

 

SOURCES:

 

Sunset Valley Orchids Item No. "SVO 7512"

 

 
 

Brief Grow Blog and Pictures

 
 

February 2019

Acquired from Sunset Valley Orchids.  This three-year-old seedling has 2 bulbs and upon removing from the box I was happy to discover it had already started developing a new growth for the 2019 growing season. It is currently situated in a 3-inch pot in moss with styrofoam peanuts filling the bottom 1/3 of the pot surrounded by abundant roots.  Old roots do not contribute to the new growth.

 

As the orchid is still considered dormant and the last bulb is supplying nutrients and water for the new growth, nothing is required  except allowing to be exposed in indirect sunlight in a relatively humid environment.  On occasion, to prevent the last year's bulb from shriveling, I will mist the orchid and that water will run down and add moisture to the area immediately surrounding the base of the bulb.  Keeping the entire orchid in a high humidity environment should also preventi last year's bulb from shriveling.

 

I will be watching for the new growth to extend to about an inch in length and new roots from its base.  Once the roots are about 2 inches in length and the new growth has developed and spreading of tiny leaves, I will consider the next step of potting up in fresh slightly damp moss removing the old styrofoam.The moss will be kept barely damp with a small amount of water as needed.  The terrarium and its high humidity is no longer required as the new roots have started taking in water.  It will be positioned in the mini-greenhouse with bright light and high humidity along with warm temperatures during th day and cooling off at night. As the new growth increases in size, watering will also be increased along with the adding of fertilizer.

 

10 February

Based on advice from this article, I fought off the hesitation to do this, but Fred Clarke said it is fine in a dry climate to water dormant bulbs.  SO I did, and lucky to pick a partly coudy day where they were drenched and set in the mini-greenhouse to dry in the sun on the same day before sunset.  ( http://herebutnot.com/care-growing-catasetinae-dry-climates/ )

 

A few days after I removed the orchid from the pot to speed up the drying of the root mass.

 

When possible, I had it sitting  in the mini-greenhouse getting a few hours of diluted sunlight.  The new growths continue to get taller, almost reaching a length of 1.5 inches.  This item may be re-potted beginning of March.

 

 

 

1 March 2019

New growth is poking it's head above the moss.  Follow the bulb down to the moss and it is just in the shade side of the sun / shade line.  During sunny days, it is placed in the mini-greenhouse with the new growth facing the bright side.  It is not exposed to fulol sunlight so as prevent any burning.  On ocassion, I mist the top of the moss for some extra humidity in the mini-greenhouse.

 

 

 

1 May 2019

Care:  Moss in a semi-hydroponic, almost clear plastic food container.  Exposed to bright light, but not direct "cattleya" light.  All greenhouse items are placed in a water tray for extra humidity due to evaporation.

Comparing the April picture and the current May image, you can get an idea just how fast these grow.

I increased the watering amount and frequency and used a diluted fertilizer once a week.  As for watering,  I would drench the moss, almost drowning it, and then tilt the pot so excess water drain out to a level below the drainage holes.  The moss would then wick the water up to the top keeping everything evenly moist.

I had to adjust the shelves in 2 of the mini-greenhouses so that the Fredclarkeras get optimum light.  This was expected.  Brighter light means better blooms.  I could tell there was sufficient light by a shadow from my hand.  Fredclarkeras are heat tolerant, so if it was above 80-degrees, in the greenhouse it be warmer, but also more humid.  If it was above 90-degrees, I just keep the flaps open so the heated air could escape easily.

 

Note for next year - rotate more frequently the Fredclarkeras so the new growth reaches up and not to the side.  Vertical Fredclarkeras take less space than horizontal Fredclarkeras.

 

 

 

 

1 June 2019

Care:  Moss in a semi-hydroponic, almost clear plastic food container.  Exposed to bright light, but not direct "cattleya" light.  All greenhouse items are placed in a water tray for extra humidity due to evaporation.

Fredclarkeras are water hogs, so drowning from over-watering is difficult at best.  Starting back in late April, when the new growth was about 2 inches tall, I started watering to moisten the moss with a few squirts from a turkey baster near but not immediately surrounding the new growth.  Once the new growth reached 4 inches, I could only guess the roots were established (2-3 inches in length) and started absorbing water, so I would increase watering with a balanced but very diluted fertilizer.  In may, I slightly increased the fertilizer and watering as needed.  Because their is a reservoir of water at the bottom of the pot, I did not fertilize except for once a week, the rest of the waterings during that week would dilute the reservoir.  2 spikes formed almost immediately (see images above).

Into June, watering was just about everyday and feeding was still once a week.

 

 

 

 

July 2019

Care:  Moss in a semi-hydroponic, almost clear plastic food container.  Exposed to bright light, but not direct "cattleya" light.  All greenhouse items are placed in a water tray for extra humidity due to evaporation.  Exposure (time of) direct light is on the increase as the solstice has passed and the sun slowly gets lower in the horizon.  This also means heat is on the increase in the mini-greenhouse as well.

 

Fredclarkeras are water hogs, so drowning from over-watering is difficult at best.  Starting back in late April, when the new growth was about 2 inches tall, I started watering to moisten the moss with a few squirts from a turkey baster near but not immediately surrounding the new growth.  Once the new growth reached 4 inches, I could only guess the roots were established (2-3 inches in length) and started absorbing water, so I would increase watering with a balanced but very diluted fertilizer.  In may, I slightly increased the fertilizer and watering as needed.  Because their is a reservoir of water at the bottom of the pot, I did not fertilize except for once a week, the rest of the waterings during that week would dilute the reservoir. 

 

With the advent of July, watering with very diluted fertilizer is just about every oher day and during any heatwave more as needed.

 

 

 

 

August 2019

Doing as well as expected.  No spike(s) have been spotted as of yet but there is hope it bloom this season.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fredclarkeara

(Mormodia Painted Desert 'SVO' HCC/AOS  x  Catasetum callosum 'Black Lip' AM/AOS)

 

  Flowering by Week 1 to 52
AVE. 1 2 3 4 5 4 7 8 6 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52
 
2019 1 2 3 4 5 4 7 8 6 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52
2020 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52

 

 

 
I possess this orchid new growth spotted leaflets and roots growth stage  spike  bloom  dormancy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://herebutnot.com/care-growing-catasetinae-dry-climates/

 

 

 

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