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Mormodes sinuata

 

Common Name The Crooked Mormodes

 

Flower Size .8" [2 cm]

 

A small to medium sized, hot growing epiphyte that is found on older rotting tree branches from Venezuela and Brazil with clustered, fusiform pseudobulbs enveloped completely by grey nervose sheaths becoming evanescent with age, and carrying, thin, plicate, lanceolate, acute leaves that blooms on 1 or 2 ascending, few to several [8 to 15] flowered inflorescence that arises from the lower half of a mature pseudobulb with or without leaves and has slightly fragrant flowers that occur in the spring.

 

http://www.orchidspecies.com/mormsinuata.htm

 

Mormodes sinuata ABG # 07-2342 flowering at the Fuqua Orchid Center

 

Distribution:

 

This species range is W. Central & SE. Brazil.

http://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:644994-1

 

 

Variants:

 

 

 

Synonyms:

 

 

 

 

Gallery:   (Click on images to view the original image)

 

Photo Credit:  Petr Kocna

 

   

 

 

Photo above is of an orchid (Mormodes sinuatum) which was cultivated by Mr. Yoshihiro Kagawa and displayed at the Orchid Show 2007 in Ginza Matuzakaya (Tokyo, Japan).

http://orchids.la.coocan.jp/Mormodes/Mormodes%20sinuatum/Mormodes%20sinuatum.htm

 

 General Information:

 

Mormodes sinuata is native to Brazil and Venezuela. In Brazil, this orchid is found in the lowlands and savannas inland, at heights of 500-1000 m, in the states of Minas Gerais, Goiás and in the Federal District. In Venezuela, they were met in the state of Carabobo..

Mormodes sinuata also called as The Crooked Mormodes, is a species of the genus Mormodes. This species was described by Heinrich Gustav Reichenbach & Johannes Eugen ius Bülow Warming in 1881.

 

 

 

Identify Mormodes sinuata

 

Mormodes sinuata is native to Brazil and Venezuela. In Brazil, this orchid is found in the lowlands and savannas inland, at heights of 500-1000 m, in the states of Minas Gerais, Goiás and in the Federal District. In Venezuela, they were met in the state of Carabobo.
 
It is a small to medium sized, hot growing epiphyte, which reaching a height up to 45 cm, with clustered, fusiform, 20 cm long and 4 cm wide pseudobulbs enveloped completely by grey nervose sheaths becoming evanescent with age, and carrying, thin, plicate, lanceolate, acute, up to 25 cm long and 4 cm wide leaves.
 
The Crooked Mormodes blooms on 1 or 2 ascending, 8 to 15 flowered inflorescence that arises from the lower half of a mature pseudobulb with or without leaves and has slightly fragrant flowers that occur in the spring. The flowers are about 3.3 cm in diameter between the tops of the side outer petals. The petals and sepals are from yellow to wine-red and covered with numerous narrow darker longitudinal veins. The lip is whitish pink with thin longitudinal bright red veins. The petals and the lip are directed forward, the upper sepals lean over the column, and the lateral sepals can be either widely spread out, or strongly bent. The petals and sepals are lanceolate, pointed, almost of the same size. The three-lobed lip is folded into the tube around the column. The apex of its middle lobe ends in a small spiky outgrowth.

 

 

Mormodes sinuata Care and Culture

 

Cultural information should only be used as a guide, and should be to be adapted to suit you. Your physical location; where you grow your plants, how much time you have to devote to their care, and many other factors, will need to be taken into account. Only then can you decide on the cultural methods that best suit you and your plants.
 
 

Light:

Mormodes sinuata needs a light level of 25000-40000 lux. Bright light should be slightly filtered, because the southern sun can damage the plants. Strong air movement should be ensured all the time.

 

Temperature:

It is a thermophilic plant. In summer the average day temperature is 27-28 ° C, night 18 ° C, which gives a daily difference of 9-10 ° C. In winter, the average day temperature is 28-31 ° C, at night 12-13 ° C, with a daily amplitude of 16-17 ° C.

 

Humidity:

From late spring until the beginning of autumn, The Crooked Mormodes needs the humidity of 85-90%, then it gradually decreases and at the end of winter, for a period of about one month, it is 60%.

 

Substrate, growing media:

Mormodes sinuata grow well attached to pieces of tree ferns, with high humidity provided, and during the summer they will be irrigated at least once a day. In the case of such mounted plants, during the dry and hot periods it may be necessary to water several times a day.
 
However, these plants are usually grow in pots or baskets, using a loose substrate that rapidly drains excess water that contains substances that retain a certain amount, such as sphagnum cut peat moss and perlite. Wood charcoal is also often added to ensure the air permeability of the substrate and protection against acidification. In addition to the standard fir bark substrate, growers successfully use sphagnum moss, pumice, cork pieces, and even a mixture of equal parts of fermented and fresh horse manure and charcoal. As you can see, you can use almost any substrate, provided you choose the right pattern of watering.

 

Repotting and dividing:

 Mormodes sinuata ABG # 07-2342 flowering at the Fuqua Orchid Center

If only sphagnum moss is used as the substrate, then annual repotting will be necessary, because such a substrate decomposes quite quickly. Many people recommend repotting every year regardless of the type of substrate used, but this is not absolutely necessary until it begins to decompose. Repotting is carried out when a new growth appears at the base of the pseudobulb.
 
All pseudobulbs should be separated and only 1-2 pseudobulbs are left in the pot. Because the old roots are dying, most of them can be cut off. A few can be left to facilitate plant fixing in new substrate until new roots develop. After repotting, no plants are watered until the new growth release the roots into a new substrate, and its height reach 10-12 cm. Only then you can take a normal watering, paying attention to the fact that the water does not get into the funnel parting in the new growth, because it can destroy the growth due to decay.
 
After repotting 1-2 pseudobulbs, the remaining can be used as the beginnings of new plants. The old roots should be removed, and the pseudobulbs laid flat in a shallow container with sphagnum moss. After some time, from the bottom or sides of the pseudobulb grows new growths. Some recommend that in the waiting period older tubers should be placed in an upright position in empty pots. It may take up to several months before a new growth occurs, but once it appears, the pseudobulb with the new increment should be planted in such a way that the new increment is on the surface of the substrate, or slightly below. If there are several increments along the sides of the pseudobulb, simply place it on the surface of the substrate.

 

Watering:

Mormodes sinuata should often be watered during active growth from spring to autumn, but excellent drainage should be ensured so that the substrate within the roots is not degraded or soggy. In autumn, watering should be limited.

 

Fertilizer:

During the active growth, the plants should be fertilized every week 1/4-1/2 of the recommended dose of fertilizer for orchids. You can use sustainable fertilizer throughout the year or use high-nitrogen fertilizer from spring to mid-summer, then switching to high-phosphorus in late summer and autumn.
 

Rest period:

In winter, Mormodes sinuata need less water. After the leaves have fallen, you can limit watering to such an amount that the pseudobulbs do not get too wrinkled. Too much water in the winter is the fastest way to kill the plants. You can cut off leaves that did not fall before the end of autumn to force the plant to sleep. Fertilization should be eliminated until new growths appear and more watering begins in the spring.

 

https://travaldo.blogspot.com/2018/02/mormodes-sinuata-care-and-culture.html

 

 

Posted by Becky Brinkman

 

'Like a goblin'--is the fanciful etymology of Mormodes Lindley (from the Greek mormo, meaning 'goblin'; and odes, meaning 'like a') describing this orchid's strange male flower with its twisted column. I can imagine how the features of a goblin's face might twist as it breaks into a grin.

 

Mormodes sinuata. The yellow column is twisted to the side, exposing the anther.

 

Why would an orchid flower have a twisted column? Because it's part of a unique pollination mechanism. The twisted column places the pollinarium (the pollinia, stipe and sticky viscidium) in the correct position on the pollinator's thorax.

 

Charles Darwin was the first person to investigate how Mormodes flowers are pollinated when he studied Mormodes ignea (published in The Various Contrivances by Which British Orchids and Foreign Orchids are Fertilized, 1862).

 

The flower's fragrance attracts a male Euglossine bee (genus Euglossa). As the bee lands on the lip, it strikes the apex of the column, opening the anther cap. The pollinarium, with its sticky disc, swings forward onto the back of the bee. After 30 minutes the pollinia packet dries and uncoils into the correct position for placement onto the female flower.

 

Reading Contrivances again I have to admire Darwin's patient and painstaking attention to minute detail as he analyzes this whole procedure. "At the close of the twelfth trial I was in despair...," he laments. But he persists. With only twelve flowers at his disposal, Darwin figures out the mechanism using needles of different diameter in place of a pollinator. 

http://www.theorchidcolumn.com/2012/12/mormodes-sinuata-goblin.html

 

Awarded Exhibits:

1999 - 11

Mormodes sinuata 'Sunset Valley Orchids' HCC/AOS. Fred Clarke 1999-11-08

     
1988 - 12
Mormodes sinuata 'J & M' AM/AOS.  J. & M. Tropicals  1988-12-03 
 
     
1980 - 12
Mormodes sinuata 'Patti' AM/AOS. William T.  Hammond 1980-12-06
 
     
1979 - 12
Mormodes sinuata 'Kimberly' HCC/AOS.  Dr.  Ronnie Kennedy 1979-12-01
 
     
1978 - 11 Mormodes sinuata 'Toby' AM/AOS.  Brian Gaine 1978-11-22   
  Mormodes sinuata 'Toby' CCM/AOS.  Brian T.  Gaine 1978-11-22   
     
1976 - 11
Mormodes sinuata 'R. F.  Orchids' AM/AOS.  Robert Fuchs 1976-11-10
 
     
1975 - 10
Mormodes sinuata 'Eureka' CBM/AOS.  Eureka Orchid Gardens 1975-10-17 
 

 

https://catasetinaecanada.weebly.com/awarded-mormodes.html

https://orchids.org/grexes/mormodes-sinuata

 

 

Read More:

 

http://www.delfinadearaujo.com/on/on13/paginas/kleb04en.htm

http://catasetinae.com/gallery402.htm

http://bluenanta.com/orchid/130076/species_detail/?tab=gal

 

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