Mormodia Lime Tiger

 

Mormodia Lime Tiger is an orchid hybrid originated by Fred Clarke in 2009. It is a cross of Clowesia Grace Dunn 'Live Oak' HCC/AOS x Mormodes elegans v. alba 'SVO' HCC/AOS.

 

SVO 5338 (2015)


Mo. Lime Tiger (Cl. Grace Dunn 'Live Oak' HCC/AOS x Morm. elegans v. alba 'SVO' HCC/AOS)

This was such a great cross the first time around I decided to remake it (which I don't often do).  Cl. Grace Dunn (Cl. rosea x Cl. warscewitzii) a beautiful frilly pink flowers with a citrus fragrance produced on multiple pendent inflorescences. The Morm. elegans v. alba has 3-5 upright spikes per bulb, carrying 12-15 flowers each in light green with darker green stripes.  Mormodes are dominant for color transfer to their offspring.  These will be blooming with light green flowers with darker green stripes produced on pendent inflorescences.  Very showy.

 

Photo Credit: https://catasetinaecanada.weebly.com

SVO 5342 (2015)

Mo. Lime Tiger (Cl. Grace Dunn 'Chadds Ford' AM/AOS   x Morm. elegans v. alba 'SVO' HCC/AOS )

This was such a great cross the first time around I remake it twice, see above SVO 5338.  This Cl. Grace Dunn (Cl. rosea x Cl. warscewitzii) is similar to 'Live Oak' however it has flowers that are a little bit larger. The Morm. elegans v. alba has 3-5 upright spikes per bulb, carrying 12-15 flowers each in light green with darker green stripes.  These will be blooming with light green flowers with darker green stripes produced on pendent inflorescences.  Very showy.

 

SVO 1854 (2010)

Mo. Lime Tiger (Cl. Grace Dunn ‘Live Oak’ HCC/AOS x Morm. elegans v. alba ‘SVO’ HCC/AOS)

This grex is similar in shape to Mo. Painted Desert. Grace Dunn (Cl. warscewiczii x Cl. rosea) will be recessive for color and dominate for shape. The elegans v. alba will lend its lime green color and dark green stripes. Expect full shaped lime green flowers with darker stripes…. a very unusual color combination not seen in this group.


SVO 1854 (2009)     (Clo. Grace Dunn ‘Live Oak' HCC/AOS x Morm. elegans alba ‘SVO' HCC/AOS)

This will also be similar to Mo. Painted Desert in form but I am expecting the dark green stripes and lime green flowers of Morm. elegans to dominate the color. Very unusual color combination not seen in this group. Unusual and different.

 

Ancestry:

 

( Clowesia Grace Dunn 'Live Oak' HCC/AOS x Mormodes elegans v. alba ‘SVO’ HCC/AOS ) 

 

Culture:

 

Mormodia is another artificial genus produced by breeding Clowesia but this time with Mormodes. This group of orchids is again an interesting breeding combination producing multiple flowers, vigorous growth and the possibility of flowering two to three times a year. Typically, their now trigger-less flowers have a flower life that is longer than for pure Catasetums. 

Mormodia are heavy feeders during their growing period but a dry rest period of differing lengths according to species is needed after flowering, specifically, once the plants start to drop leaves. Water is gradually reduced, then withheld. If at all, water sparingly only to prevent pseudobulbs from shrinking too much. Once new growth reaches 4 inches and new roots reach 2 or more inches long, watering is begun, with normal abundant watering taking place once the potting mix again approaches dryness. Fertilize well during the active growing season as the plant does not get a chance to be fertilized during its dry rest period. Mormodia like humidity of 50-70% with warm day temperatures of 75-80 F (24-27 C) dropping 10-15 F (6-8 C) at night. Repot just as new growth is beginning at the end of the dry rest.

https://catasetinaecanada.weebly.com/mormodia-mo.html

 

Stephen's Catasetinae Culture

 

Catasetum, Clowesia, Cycnoches, and Mormodes are the primary genera that  compose the catasetinae.  They can be grown easily without the necessity of a greenhouse. They can grow in just about every kind of medium that you can imagine.  Here's how Stephen grows his catasetums.

 

Growing Area.

I grow all of my plants outside under a large shade house covered with 60% shade in the growing season and bring them into the greenhouse when the weather turns cold and they begin their dormancy.

 

Potting Mixes.

I have seen them grown in rock, lava rock, rock wool, and all of the other orchid potting materials that are on the market.  I use a mix of one part large sponge rock, one part medium charcoal, and one part peat moss. The pots are top dressed with a sprinkle of time release fertilizer and a thin layer of sphagnum to keep the fertilizer from splashing out. Since I grow outside under shade cloth I pot all my Catasetums in clay pots. They dry out faster and I do not lose any plants to rot whenever we have those months of rain every day for weeks at a time. 

 

Spring Growth Cycle.

In the spring they will send up a new growth and start the growth cycle all over again. This is the time to repot the plants.  Remove the plant from the pot and  cut most of the old roots off. Leave enough of the old dead roots on to stabilize the plant.  Repot the plant slightly below the top of last year\92s growth and position the new growth in the center of the pot. Move the plant to a warm growing area where it will get moderate light. DO NOT WATER AT THIS TIME! Wait until the new growth opens up with a leaf span of \BD to 1 inch across. Only then do you start to water and feed the plant. Any old back bulbs can be cut from the plant and repotted in a dry mix. They will send up a new growth in a month or so.

 

Growing Season Care.

Catasetums are heavy feeders and like a lot of water during the spring and summer. However, they do not like to be kept wet for an extended period of time.

 

Winter Care.

Bring the catasetums into the greenhouse only when the weather turns cold in October.  By this time most of the plants have begun to shed their leaves and begun their dormant period. At this time I do not water or feed them unless they are still in an active growing stage. Many of them will also be in spike and will be blooming for the second and third time.  The plants should not be exposed to temperatures below 55F for an extended time. They can be kept on a window sill or somewhere in the house in the winter without any water or sun light.

 

Pest Control.

Another significant advantage to growing Catasetums is that scale does not seem to favor these orchids.  I have some trouble occasionally with mealy bugs and spider mites.    I use a new product called Sorbishield that is a sugar based, nontoxic product for spider mites and mealy bugs and other soft bodied pests. So far this product has been very good.

http://catasetinae.com/culture.htm

 

Awarded Exhibits:

 

 

Top Photo:

Mo. Lime Tiger 'St. Augustine' AM/AOS (82 pts)

Sue Bottom 2011-01-08,   Courtesy Terry Bottom

 

Right Photo:

Mo. Lime Tiger 'Sunset Valley Orchids' AM/AOS (82 pts)
 
Fred Clarke 2010-01-04,   Courtesy Fred Clarke

 

Left Photo:

Mormodia Lime Tiger 'SVO II' HCC/AOS (77 pts)

Fred Clarke  2013-01-03, Photo Courtesy Arnold Gum of Pacific South Judging Region (San Diego)    

 

 

Additional Information

 

 

 

 

 

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