MISCELLANEOUS GENERA

MISCELLANEOUS GENERA (23)

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MASDEVALLIA

MASDEVALLIA (3)

mas-deh-VAHL-lee-ah

 

Masdevallia is a genus of some 350 species usually from cool, misty mountains of the New World Tropics. Masdevallias are best known for their showy flowers consisting of sepals fused into a tubelike structure. Their origins in cool, damp environments make them an excellent choice for cool or coastal climates. Most species and hybrids are compact enough so that they can be easily accommodated on windowsills or under lights. ("Masdevallia angulifera Orchi 01" by Orchi - Self-photographed. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.) Click image for larger view.

 

 

 

 

LYCASTE

LYCASTE (6)


Lycaste
Lycaste skinneri Orchi 07.jpg
Lycaste skinneri
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Orchidaceae
Subfamily: Epidendroideae
Tribe: Maxillarieae
Subtribe: Lycastinae
Genus: Lycaste
Lindl., 1843
Species

See text

Synonyms

Deppia Raf.

Lycaste, abbreviated as Lyc in horticultural trade, is a genus of orchids that contains about 30 species with egg-shaped pseudobulbs and thin, plicate (pleated) leaves.

Description

Lycaste flowers, like all orchid blooms, have three petals and three sepals. The petals are typically yellow, white, or orange, and the sepals are yellow, orange, green, or reddish brown. The petals and sepals may be marked sparsely or densely with red, reddish purple, purple, or reddish brown spots. The lip (ventral petal) may be very similar to the other two petals, as in Lycaste aromatica or Lycaste brevispatha, or colored quite distinctively, as in several subspecies and varieties of Lycaste macrophylla. Most Lycaste flowers are medium in size, averaging about 5 to 10 cm, but Lyc. schilleriana is 16-18 cm across. Some Lycaste blooms have a unique fragrance - the scent of Lyc. aromatica has been variously described as cinnamon or clove. The blooms of the species Lyc. cochleata, consobrina, and cruenta also have a pleasant scent.

Taxonomy

The World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, maintained by the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, is recognized by the American Orchid Society as the definitive authority on orchid taxonomy. The Checklist currently acknowledges 31 species of Lycaste, 3 natural hybrids, 2 subspecies (and 1 nominate subspecies), and 1 variety. Orchid growers and orchid collectors, who tend to be taxonomic "splitters" more often than "lumpers" (see lumpers and splitters), recognize additional subspecies and varieties of Lycaste, as well as alba (white) forms of several species.

The Lycastes have been divided into four sections, one of which has two subsections:

  • Section Deciduosae - deciduous, that is, they usually lose their leaves during an annual dormant period
    • Subsection Xanthanthae - have yellow to orange blooms; the name is from xantho - yellow, and anthos - flower
    • Subsection Paradeciduosae - have pink-marked white blooms; the name is from para- similar or near, and deciduosae- deciduous ones
  • Section Longisepalae - has very long sepals
  • Section Macrophyllae - keep their leaves during dormancy; the name is from macro- large and phyllae- leaves
  • Section Fimbriatae - typically have fringed lips

All but two of the Deciduosae have spines at the apices of their pseudobulbs, that become exposed when the leaves are dropped - the exceptions are a Xanthanthae species, Lycaste lasioglossa, and a Paradeciduosae species, Lycaste tricolor. Both of these species lack spines, and may bloom when leaves are still present.

The recognized Xanthanthae species include:

The Paradeciduosae species include:

The Macrophyllae form a large complex, with subspecies and varieties that can be considered to be in the process of differentiating into new full species. The Macrophyllae species include:

The Fimbriatae species include:

Natural hybrids :

  • Lycaste × groganii (Lycaste aromatica × Lycaste deppei)
  • Lycaste × michelii (Lycaste cochleata × Lycaste lasioglossa)
  • Lycaste × smeeana (Lycaste deppei × Lycaste skinneri)

Hybrids

  • Angulocaste (Anguloa x Lycaste)
  • Cochlecaste (Cochleanthes x Lycaste)
  • Colaste (Colax x Lycaste)
  • Lycasteria (Bifrenaria x Lycaste)
  • Lycida (Ida x Lycaste)
  • Maxillacaste (Lycaste x Maxillaria)
  • Zygocaste (Lycaste x Zygopetalum)

A recently published (2003) revision of Lycaste by Henry Oakeley and Angela Ryan split off most of the species of section Fimbriatae as the new genus Ida. The 34 species of Ida occur in South America or in the Caribbean Islands (Ida barringtoniae), while true Lycastes occur mostly in Mexico and Central America. The genus Ida is recognized by the World Checklist of Monocotyledons.

BULBOPHYLLUM

BULBOPHYLLUM (4)

 

 

Bulbophyllum

 

Bulbophyllum is one of the largest genera in the orchid family Orchidaceae. With more than 2,000 species, it is also one of the largest genera of flowering plants, exceeded only by Astragalus.[2] This genus is abbreviated in the trade journals as Bulb. It is found throughout most of the warmer parts of the world: Africa, southern Asia, Latin America, the West Indies, and various islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.[1]

 

References

  1. Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
  2. David G. Frodin (2004). "History and concepts of big plant genera". Taxon 53 (3): 753–776. doi:10.2307/4135449. JSTOR 4135449.

Bibliography

  • J.J. Vermeulen : Orchid Monographs Vol. 7 (1993), A taxonomic revision of Bulbophyllum, sections Adelopetalum, Lepanthanthe, Macrouris, Pelma, Peltopus, and Uncifera (Orchidaceae). iv + 324 pp., 25 text-figs. + 116 full-page line drawings, 6 pp. colour plates. ISBN 90-71236-17-X
  • Siegerist E.S.: - Bulbophyllums and their allies Timber Press, 2001, 77 colour photos, 296 pp ISBN 0-88192-506-3 - devoted solely to Bulbophyllums, it is an introductory guide for amateur and advanced orchid growers.

External links

 

MAXILLARIA

MAXILLARIA (10)

 

Maxillaria is not a popular genera among growers. Only a few species grow big, showy flowers. But some species are nevertheless sought by collectors, mostly for the fragrance of their blossoms, such as the Coconut orchid (M. tenuifolia) See photo, right. Also fragrant is the yellow Max. variablilis.  No black orchid has ever been grown yet, but Maxillaria schunkeana is probably the closest to it. Its color is actually a very dark purple-red, giving the impression of a black flower. Click above for larger image

 

 

Saturday, 12 September 2015 20:48

Maxillaria tenuifolia

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Photo Credit: Santa Barbara Orchid Estate

LIGHT Partial shade
TEMPERATURE to
HUMIDTY Relative humidity of 50 percent or higher
WATER Keep moist during growing season, allow for a winter rest
BLOOM to Fragrant, blooms from spring ininto summer

 

 
This plant has spunk: the distinctive strap-like leaves and the perky, fragrant flowers really set it apart. The triangular flowers are a vibrant brick-red, about one and one half inches across, blooming singly on three inch stems. The dried-coconut fragrance is one of its most charming traits! .Temperature Tolerant. May blooming. Species from Mexico to Northern Nicaragua.


Monday, 02 February 2015 20:15

LYCASTE, THE NYMPH WITH THE GOLDEN HAIR

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In the German Orchid magazine “Die Orchidee”, there is an extensive article by Dr. Markus Bodle, titled “Lycaste linguella – A Myth Alive!”

Monday, 02 February 2015 19:36

LYCASTE ORCHIDS - THE SPECIES

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Shopping for Lycaste, or any orchid is a very simple task, almost.  You can use this chart, copy the name of the orchid, paste the name into the Google search engine and instantly have a wealth of information at your fingertips.  This would include pictures, forums, blogs and an endless list of vendors locally and globally who be willing to sell you the exact orchid you are searching for.

Monday, 02 February 2015 18:37

LYCASTE ORCHIDS - THE HYBRIDS

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Shopping for Lycaste, or any orchid is a very simple task, almost.  You can use this chart, copy the name of the orchid, paste the name into the Google search engine and instantly have a wealth of information at your fingertips.  This would include pictures, forums, blogs and an endless list of vendors locally and globally who be willing to sell you the exact orchid you are searching for.

Monday, 02 February 2015 17:49

LYCASTE, THE BEAUTIFIL SISTER OF HELEN OF TROY

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Lycaste have been a popular orchid since Victorian era. Lycaste (now Sudamerlycaste) ciliate was the first species discovered in 1798. Lycaste skinneri was described in 1843 and remains the most popular species. There are 35 species in five sections. For horticultural purposes, these can be sorted into two groups based on their growing requirements, Evergreen & Deciduous. Lycaste breeding and cultivation is in a state that parallels the 1970’s phase of Catttleya hybridization. Hybrids are now into as many as 12 generations, the majority of hybrids are repeated backcrosses of L. skinneri back on to the complex hybrid.

Saturday, 31 January 2015 23:05

THE WORLD OF LYCASTE ORCHIDS

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We are now seeing a few more Lycaste species from time-to-time, and accordingly, I thought that it might be time to undertake a little research about this genus.

They are popular because the flowers are long lasting, and unlike some other genera, come in a wide range of colours. Few orchids rival a well grown specimen such as Lycaste skinnerii . In the past, they have been considered difficult to grow, however this myth has largely been dispelled with better understanding of their habitat and cultural needs. Lycaste species and hybrids have been grown in cultivation for more than 170 years

Saturday, 31 January 2015 22:44

LYCASTE - AOS CULTURE SHEET

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Lycaste   (Pronounced lye-KASS-tee)

Lycastes are deciduous in various degrees, from the strongly deciduous, yellow-flowered species like Lycaste aromatica that flowers from leafless pseudobulbs to the evergreen types like Lycaste skinneri with pseudobulbs that retain their leaves at flowering. This genus produces large, long-lasting, showy, triangular flowers that are waxy. The plants are distinctive for their roundish pseudobulbs and broad, plicate (pleated) leaves. Culture for the hybrid genus Angulocaste (Lycaste Anguloa) follows the culture for the Lycaste parent.

Saturday, 24 January 2015 16:48

AOS Culture Information - Masdevallia

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Masdevallia is a genus of some 350 species usually from cool, misty mountains of the New World Tropics.  Masdevallias are best known for their showy flowers consisting of sepals fused into a tubelike structure. Their origins are in cool, damp environments making them an excellent choice for cool or coastal climates.  Most species and hybrids are compact enough so that they can be easily accommodated on windowsills or under lights.

 

 

Sunday, 18 January 2015 06:35

Masdevallia imposter

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Name: Masdevallia impostor
Etymology:  impostor = pretending, acting
Origin:  Ecuador, Venezuela, Colombia  
Location:  epiphyte, between 1500 and 1900m
Propagation:  By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)
DIfficulty  intermediate
 
 
 
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